Frosty The Snowman

Frosty the Snowman, what a happy jolly soul
With a corncob pipe and a button nose
and two eyes made out of coal!

Frosty the Snowman is a fairy tale, they say!
He was made of snow, but the children know
How he came to life one day!

There must have been some magic
In that old silk hat they found
‘Cause when they put it on his head,
He began to dance around!

Frosty the Snowman was alive as he could be!
And the children say he could laugh and play
Just the same as you and me!

Frosty the Snowman knew the sun was hot that day!
So he said, “Let’s run, and we’ll have some fun
Now before I melt away!”
Down to the village with a broomstick in his hand
Running here and there, all around the square,
Saying “Catch me if you can!”

He led them down the streets of town, right to the traffic cop.
And he only paused a moment
When he hear him holler, “Stop!”

Frosty the Snowman had to hurry on his way!
But he waved goodbye saying “Don’t you cry,
I’ll be back again someday!”

Frosty the Snowman, what a happy jolly soul
With a corncob pipe and a button nose
and two eyes made out of coal!




Frosty The Snowman


           It all began with the snow. It was a special kind of snow, the kind that makes everyone happy. It was Christmas snow, because it was the day before Christmas. And that’s the most special snow of all!
           The children were still in school, but they were bored. Their teacher had hired a magician, Professor Hinkle, to perform magic tricks for them. But Professor Hinkle was a very bad magician. None of his tricks worked. Even his rabbit, Hocus Pocus, didn’t like him.
           Professor Hinkle got so angry when his tricks failed that he crushed up his magical silk hat and threw it away. The children all laughed. They thought that was funny!
           Finally the school bell rang, and all the children ran outside. Now it was time to play!
           Some of the boys started making a big snowman. Karen wanted to help. “You can make the snowman’s head, Karen,” one of them told her.
           So Karen packed some snow together and made a nice round head for their snowman.
           “What shall we call him?” she asked as they made a circle around the snowman and smiled up at it.
           “Shall we call him Harold?” one of the boys asked.
           “How about Christopher Columbus?” a girl piped up.
           “Oatmeal!” the smallest boy said.
           None of their names seemed quite right. Finally Karen had an idea. “Let’s call him Frosty!” she said.
           “Frosty! Yay, his name is Frosty!”the children yelled.
           Back in the schoolroom, Hocus Pocus was tired of being Professor Hinkle’s pet. He grabbed the magical silk hat and hopped out of the room. Professor Hinkle ran after him. “Come back here!” he yelled.
           Before he could grab Hocus Pocus, a gust of wind snatched the hat from the rabbit’s hand. Karen caught the hat, and placed it on Frosty’s snowy white head.
           Suddenly something magical happened! Frosty came alive!
          His eyes opened, and he smiled down at Karen and the other children. “Happy Birthday!” he cried.
           The children were stunned! “That hat must be magical!” Karen said. “Look, it brought Frosty to life!”
           Professor Hinkle was even more surprised! “If that hat is really magical, I want it back!” he yelled, and snatched it off Frosty’s head. Frosty instantly became just a normal snowman again.
           Karen ran after Professor Hinkle. “But that hat’s not yours anymore!” she cried. “You threw it away!”
           Professor Hinkle wouldn’t listen to her. He grabbed Hocus Pocus, and shoved him back into the hat. “This hat is going to make me a lot of money!” he laughed.
           “But it brought Frosty to life!” Karen protested. “You saw it happen!”
           Professor Hinkle stopped. “Don’t talk back to your elders, you naughty girl!” he scolded her. “I saw nothing of the kind! You silly children believe everything you see! When you’re grown up, you’ll know that snowmen can’t come to life!” And he walked away with the hat and Hocus Pocus, the rabbit.
           The children were very sad. “We don’t care what the grownups say, Frosty!” they told the snowman. “We know you really were alive! We saw it!”
           Hocus Pocus was very angry that Professor Hinkle had lied. So he grabbed the hat and jumped off Professor Hinkle’s head. Then he ran back to the children as fast as he could.
           “Look,” Karen cried as he landed at her feet. “The hat’s come back!”
           She picked the hat up and put it on Frosty’s head. And the miracle happened again! Frosty’s eyes opened, and he came to life!
           “Happy Birthday!” he cried.
           The children all cheered. “Frosty’s alive again!” they yelled.
           Frosty was happy to play with the children. Laughing, they bounced around the school yard, sliding on the snow and throwing snowballs.
           Suddenly Frosty stopped. “It’s getting hot, and I’m starting to melt!” he told the children. “I need to go someplace cold, where I’ll never melt!”
           “Then we need to get you to the North Pole!” Karen decided. “It’s always cold there!”
           The train station was on the other side of town, but they had to get Frosty there. So they decided to have a parade. “We’ll march right through town!” they told Frosty. “Come on!”
           Frosty and the children played follow the leader, and leapfrog, and tag, all through the streets of town. They had a wonderful time!
           But Frosty had never seen a traffic light before. So the policeman got very angry with him when he didn’t stop to let the cars pass.
           Karen tried to defend her new friend. “You’ve got to excuse him, Mister Policeman,” she said. “He just came to life today, and he doesn’t know much about such things.”
           “Oh, well, if he just came to life today...” the policeman grumbled. “Move along, then, move along!”
           The children cheered, and ran across the street. Suddenly the poor policeman realized that he’d been talking to a snowman! He was so shocked that he swallowed his police whistle!
           The children led Frosty to the train station. “We’d like a ticket to the North Pole, please!” Karen told the station master.
           The station master was happy to help them. “That will be three thousand dollars!” he told Karen.
           “But...we don’t have any money!” Karen admitted.
           “What!” the station master yelled. “No money, no ticket!” And he slammed the door shut in Karen’s face.
           The children were very sad. “There has to be a way to get you to the North Pole, Frosty!” they said. “Or you’ll melt away!”
           Suddenly Hocus Pocus saw a big train car nearby. It was filled with ice cream and frozen foods, so he knew it would be cold inside.
           “That train is heading for the North Pole!” Karen said. “Hide inside the freezer car, Frosty, and you can ride it all the way there! No one will see you! Then you won’t melt!”
           Frosty climbed into the car, and asked Karen if she could come with him. “I’m sure my mother won’t mind,” she told him, “as long as I’m home in time for supper!” So she climbed into the freezer car and sat down on a box of ice cream. Hocus Pocus jumped into the car, too, as the train pulled out of the station.
           “Goodbye!” Frosty called to the other children. “I’ll come back again soon! Thank you!”
           It was just plain old bad luck that Professor Hinkle was near the train station right then, and he saw Frosty and Karen in the freezer car. “I must get that hat back somehow!” he decided. So he climbed onto the last train car, and held on tight!
           The train headed north, and traveled for a long time. Frosty and Hocus Pocus were used to the cold, so they were comfortable. But Karen was getting very cold. “Karen might get sick if I can’t find some way to warm her up!” Frosty said to himself. “I have to get her off this train!”
           Suddenly the train stopped, so that another train could go by. Frosty saw his chance! “Come on, Hocus Pocus,” he told the rabbit. “We’re leaving!”
           He picked Karen up in his arms, and they jumped off the train. Professor Hinkle was still hanging onto the back of the train, and he saw them running away. “Oh, that’s not fair!” he cried. “You tricked me!”
           The train was starting to move again, so he jumped off and rolled down a steep hill. But by that time, Frosty--and the magical hat--were a long way behind him. “I have to get that hat back!” he scowled, and angrily started after them.
           Frosty wanted to get as far away from Professor Hinkle as possible. But the snow was falling, and it was getting colder by the minute. He bravely carried Karen through the hills, with Hocus Pocus following close behind. But he knew that he had to find some kind of shelter, or poor Karen might die.
           Hocus Pocus called all the forest animals, and they built a campfire for Karen on the hillside. Frosty had to sit far away from it so he wouldn’t melt, but he was very happy that Karen was finally warm.
           “We need to get Karen home again,” he told Hocus Pocus. “The forest animals are waiting for Santa Claus to come tonight. You go down and stay with them, and when he comes to give them presents, bring him up here. Then he can take Karen home, and I can go to the North Pole!”
           Hocus Pocus hopped down the hill, and rejoined the forest animals. Frosty and Karen sat near the fire, and waited for Santa Claus to appear.
           But Professor Hinkle found them first.
           “I want that hat back!” he cried, jumping into the firelight. “And I want it now!”
           Just to be mean, he threw snow all over Karen’s warm little campfire. “Now give me that hat!” he said.
           He jumped at Frosty and tried to snatch the hat off his head. But Frosty was too fast for him. He threw himself down and started to slide down the hill. “Get on my shoulders, Karen!” he yelled. “I’ll keep you safe!”
           Since Frosty was made of magical snow himself, he could slide down the hill much faster than Professor Hinkle could run. So he and Karen raced out of sight before the evil magician could take a single step.
           But Professor Hinkle wasn’t giving up that easily. He ran after them, following Frosty’s trail.
           Far away, at the bottom of the hill, was a big greenhouse. It was very bright inside, and warm, because special Christmas flowers were growing there. Frosty knew that Karen would be safe in the greenhouse, so he opened the door and stepped inside.
           “You can’t come in here, Frosty!” she told him. “It’s too warm! You’ll melt!”
           Frosty smiled. “I can stay inside for just a few minutes,” he said. “I’ll be okay!”
           He set Karen down, and they looked at the pretty red flowers.
           But before he could leave, Professor Hinkle finally caught up with them. Laughing, he slammed the door shut and locked it. “Now I have you!” he yelled. “You can’t get out! And when you’re all melted, that hat will be mine again!”
           Suddenly Professor Hinkle heard something up in the sky. He looked up just as Santa Claus and his reindeer flew overhead. Santa was going to visit the forest animals.
           When Santa landed on the hillside, Hocus Pocus ran up to him. He told Santa all about Karen and Frosty, and Professor Hinkle. Santa quickly ran down the hill, to the big greenhouse.
           But when he got there, a terrible sight met his eyes.
           Karen was safe and warm in the greenhouse, but she was crying. And Frosty was melted into a big wet puddle on the floor.
           Santa only smiled. “Don’t cry, Karen!” he said. “Frosty’s not gone for good! He was made of Christmas snow, and Christmas snow never goes away completely!  It may come back as summer rain...but when a good winter wind kisses it, it becomes Christmas snow all over again!”
           “Yes,” Karen said, wiping her eyes. “But...well, he was my friend!”
           Santa smiled again. “Just watch!” he said...and opened the greenhouse door.
           A gust of cold wind swept into the greenhouse and touched the big puddle on the floor. And something magical happened! The puddle turned into snow, and whirled outside, and became a big white snowman!
           Hocus Pocus grabbed the magical black hat, and hopped over to the snowman’s side. Karen picked up the hat, and started to place it on the snowman’s head.
           Suddenly Professor Hinkle jumped out from behind a tree. “Now wait just a minute!” he yelled. “I want that hat, and I want it now!”
           Santa scowled at him. “Don’t you dare touch that hat!” he warned. “If you even lay a finger on the brim, I’ll never bring you another Christmas present, not as long as you live!”
           Professor Hinkle was shocked. “Nothing? No more trick cards...or magic balls...or anything?”
           “Nothing!” Santa frowned.  “But...if you go home right now and write ‘I am very sorry for what I did to Frosty!’ a hundred zillion times...I might leave you something in your stocking tomorrow morning!”
           Professor Hinkle began to smile. “A new magic hat, maybe? Oh, yes, sir!” He jumped up and down, laughing, then started to run back up the hill. “Sorry to lose and run,” he called back over his shoulder, “but I’ve got to get busy writing! Busy, busy, busy!”
           Santa watched him go, then took the hat from Karen and set it on the snowman’s round head. “Come on, Frosty,” he said. “We’re all waiting for you!”
           “Happy Birthday!” Frosty cried...and they all cheered. Frosty was alive again!
           So Santa took Karen home in his magical sleigh. And when he was done delivering all his presents, he took Frosty back to the North Pole.
           But every year, Frosty comes back to play with Karen and the other children on Christmas Day, and they have a very merry Christmas together!

We hope you have a very merry Christmas, too!

Adaptation by:  Jo Grant